Bukit Jugra hike

Never judge a book by its cover, or a hill by it’s height. At a mere 120 meters above sea level, Bukit Jugra doesn’t seem like an obvious hiking destination. Yet, rising out of the monotony of monoculture, this virgin forest covered hill surprises for its dramatic views and short but sweaty challenge.

It was for this reason the KL Hiking crew (yours truly included) gathered outside of the unique Masjid Al Muttaqin in Kampung Permatang Pasir one Sunday morning, as overhead a white bellied sea eagle circled in a perfect blue sky.

Following the mosque road towards the water pipes, we turned right up a hill until we came to a dead end. Straight ahead: barren earth; to our right: a water plant. We trekked anti-clockwise around the latter and just before we were round the back, veered right again into the brush.

The water plant at the top of the tarmac road.
We take a right and walk anti-clockwise around the water plant’s perimeter.
In the words of Eminem, “go round the outside, go round the outside”.
Just before we make it all the way around the back, it’s another right off into the jungle

The trail wound its way through the jungle around Bukit Jugra with occasional roped sections marking the way forward and providing support on the surprisingly tough uphills; and they were no mere trifle. In fact I was soon gasping for air and sweating profusely.

The trail up towards the rest area – innocuous looking but in reality quite the taskmaster.

Half an hour after starting out we came to a rest area with two trails on the other side of it. We took the right up towards the peak (we took take the left on the way down).

The rest area as viewed from trail towards the peak.

Within minutes we were faced with an open gate in a fence, but veer left into the scrub instead to skirting around a long abandoned air force barracks eventually emerging at its front gate 10 minutes later.

The fence surrounding the former air force barracks, gate wide open.

Why take the direct route through the barracks when you can take the wild and wonderful alternative route around it?
The entrance to former air force barracks of Skuadron Sayap Tempur,, now dilapidated and in the midst of being torn down. The squadron specialised in sea rescue and had a helicopter pad on site.

The path ahead is a tarmac road surrounded by a permanent forest reserve of virgin jungle. It leads to the Bukit Jugra lighthouse where we turned in, the sight that met us a revelation.

The road towards the lighthouse surrounded on either side by permanent virgin forest reserve.
The Bukit Jugra lighthouse.

Stretching out beneath us was  a wide open plain, part marsh, mostly oil palm plantations bordered by a narrow ribbon of protective mangrove, and divided by the expanse of the Sungai Langat as it plotted its final course towards the Straits of Melaka. On the other side of the river, Carey Island.

This strategic location is why Jugra was once a royal town and state capital, and why Bukit Jugra or Parcelar Hill as it was once known, was chosen for a lighthouse.

One helluva view.
Hot but breezy you could sit ad stare for hours…. Note the paragliding landing spot to the right near the river’s edge.
Gimme a “J”. Gimme a “U”. Gimme a “G” … you know the rest.

Parking myself on the steps under the “Jugra” sign that marks the lookout point, I watched a ship as it silently made its way down river to join others like it out at sea. Behind me was the low hum of the lighthouse, above the buzz of several drones.

Overhead a Brahmini kite flew past soaring on the thermals. If it were later in the day, this raptor would have been joined by paragliders as this is where they suit up and take off.  Their landing site located a 10 to 15 minute flight away, was visible beneath the scrub.

One of several drones spotted that day.

Our return journey saw us backtrack down the same route we came, the exception being that at the rest area we took a right down a shorter, steeper trail most of it roped off on either side.

The way down – shorter, steeper and slightly different from the away up.

Within 10 minutes we were at the forest’s edge, a perimeter fence separating us from the denuded hillside beyond. We crossed the open expanse of red earth and headed towards the water plant where the tarmac road back towards the mosque began.

Of course, there was no telling how long this return route will remain passable; I noticed an alternative trail left of the one we took just before the fence, but as I can only vouch for what I know, I’d recommend taking the same route down as the one we took up.

Our way through, but probably not for long….
What’s left of this side of Bukit Jugra.
Overlooking Kampung Permatang Pasir.

The final leg – the tarmac road from the water plant back towards the mosque.

8.40am Start hike
8.43am Duck behind the water plant
9.12am Arrive at rest area and take the trail on the right
9.15am Turn off just before the fence gate
9.23am Arrive at tarmac road
9.30am arrive at lighthouse
10.45am leave lighthouse
11.22am Arrive at mosque

Altitude 140 meters

Time and distance 50 minutes up, 40 minutes down.  1 hour an a half hours in total not including breaks. 5.7km round trip.

Rating Easy to moderate.

Facilities None

Jalan Raba Permatang Pasir located directly opposite the beautiful Al Mutaqqin mosque.

Getting there Our designated meeting point was Masjid Al Muttaqin on Jalan Bukit Jugra, Kampung Permatang Pasir, Banting, Kuala Langat, 42700, Selangor.
Coordinates 2.837377, 101.430081

Other attractions Survey the landscape below from a paraglider. Both Oxbold and Paragliders.my offer tandem paragliding experiences for RM220/pax for 10 to 15 minutes airtime.

Post hike treat Chelliah Toppu aka Banting Toddy Joint. I blame Wei Ching (hehe) . About 16 of us went with her idea and drove 12.3km to this unexpected gem situated next to a patch of oil palm trees.

The specialty is toddy, an alcoholic drink made from the fermented sap of a coconut palm flower. Under palm frond cabanas you can enjoy yours poured from large clay pots designed to keep the milky-hued drink chilled;  the small plastic bag of ice secreted inside does as well, without watering it down.

As you can’t drink on an empty stomach, this licensed toddy joint also serves up a simple mee hoon, and rice with a choice of curries – chicken, lamb, wild boar (!), monitor lizard (!!), as well as (phew!) a vegetarian option. After parking head round back to the toddy garden and place your food and drink orders at the hole in the wall.

The Chelliah family home.
No cheers, bottoms up or yam seng. in fact don’t waste time on any of that, just drink up.

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